FUTUR(S)
TRENDS
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LOOKING FOR A RELEASE

This month we propose an overview of the thoughts expressed in the Futur(s) 13 Trend Book on diversion tactics and the quest for pressure releasing outlets.

Happy exploring!

Our research shows that over the past three years strong individual resistance has emerged in response to the crisis and globalization. Caught in the vicious cycle of austerity, pushed to their limit, individuals want to take control of their lives. For young people this is achieved by opposing the symbols of what they see as a broken system. The emergence of outlets to release the pressure is a way to find alternative solutions, embrace change, break out of the routine and reinvent the rules and standards of tomorrow.  

These diversion tactics are illustrated by ever-increasing examples of the use of the absurd, of irony, cynicism and extravagance. They are the new weapons of subversion, new forms of expression and creation. But these behaviors also act as a liberating catharsis.

1. LOL ARTcelebrates a new generation of artists such as David Shrigley who cultivates sharp gag art, denouncing the snobbism of the contemporary art, world all the while getting strong messages across in a form that borders on cynicism. 2. Somewhere between absurdity and social catharsis, the HARLEM SHAKE, choreographed by the Japanese comedian Filthy Frank in a video, became a global phenomenon seen by over 250 million people in 2013.

These tactics also encourage people to release impulses and display uninhibited behaviors ranging from good-natured fun to deviance. There is an unheard-of fascination today for those who dare, those who show their uniqueness, for controversy and ambiguity. People are encouraged to express fears, revolt, desires as ways of finding release, which in the end are intense vectors of resilience. 

1. DIVORCE PARTIES: after her break-up, the pop star Katy Perry organized a « divorce party » in late 2012. This increasingly popular  « ceremony », which is becoming a real business in Japan and the USA, consists of celebrating the end of one’s marriage. It’s a way of seeing a break-up not as the end of a love story, but as living proof of one’s resilience. 2. The film THIS IS THE END by Seth Rogen (2013), a parody of apocalypse movies, is an offbeat take on the end of the world as experienced by a handful of celebrities who play themselves (Rihanna, Emma Watson, James Franco)… A rather subtle way to counter the bleakness of daily life and at the same time a way to criticize those who feed on the fears of a world in crisis.

Infiltrating all layers of society, revved up by the power of social media, this quest for a release continues to transform society into a space that positively welcomes the notion of rupture. Brands employ the phenomenon in their advertising tone: revisiting Pop Art, questioning the system to win the approval of certain audiences, valorization of freedom, non-conformity and the emotional. It is also a powerful vector of innovation for brands: breaking with customs to reinvent market codes, detachment and diversion for new products with entirely new uses or functions, surprise and disruption for unusual, addictive services (in particular in the luxury sector).

 1-2. MOSCHINO and CHANEL CATWALKS FW14-15: in a spirit of POP ART, two brands under their designer’s influence use diversion tactics to express critical visions of consumer society, and luxury itself? A new approach, new esthetics to create a buzz! 2. COOL NECKLACE by Lanvin FW 13/14, a maxinecklace with a hip-hop-style message: a hint of self-mockery breaks with the stiltedcodes of the luxury universe.

 

 

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